Category Archives: Self Care Sunday’s

Self Care Sunday Series, Laughter Can Be Healing

It may not seem like it, but laughter is one of the best medications we can self prescribe. 

It’s true that laughter is the best medicine and making jokes actually has a physical effect on the body. 

Laughter boosts your mood, raises metabolism, strengthens the immunity system, diminishes pain and helps decrease the effects of stress.

Boosting your mood, there was a scientific study done by the Mayo Clinic about Stress Management and laughter.

  • Stimulate many organs.  Laughter enhances your intake of oxygen-rich air, stimulates your heart, lungs and muscles, and increases the endorphins that are released by your brain.
  • Activate and relieve your stress response.  A rollicking laugh fires up and then cools down your stress response, and it can increase and then decrease your heart rate and blood pressure. The result? A good, relaxed feeling.
  • Soothe tension.  Laughter can also stimulate circulation and aid muscle relaxation, both of which can help reduce some of the physical symptoms of stress.

Norwegian scientists found that people with a strong sense of humor outlived those who don’t laugh as much.

Social benefits of laughing

The world could use a little more laughter right now. I’m not saying that what’s going on around the world should be laughed about, what I am trying to make people realize making jokes, seeing someone 😊 changes our mood. Changing our moods for a positive instead of a negative makes the day flow better.

I wish you all health and happiness. Please work together so we as a society can come out and play again soon.

Gain The Advantage.

Alicia Osmera

Self Care Sunday’s Series Mental Health During Times Of A Crisis

In today’s Self Care Sundays series I want to address mental health for everyone. During this time across the world, mental health care should be addressed not just for those already with behavioral and mental health issues, but our first responders, healthcare professionals, grocery store workers, truck drivers and so many more.

Mental health is just as important as physical health. My biggest concern is for my fellow colleagues and what’s going to happen to their mental health when our hospitals are overrun with patients.

I found a great article by the CDC on stress and coping during this pandemic outbreak.  As healthcare workers, we are constantly tending to the needs of others; while we tend to forget our own mental and physical health needs.

If you, or someone you care about, are feeling overwhelmed with emotions like sadness, depression, or anxiety, or feel like you want to harm yourself or others call

  • 911
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA’s) Disaster Distress Helpline: 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746. (TTY 1-800-846-8517)

Healthcare Workers

For healthcare workers, it’s quite natural to feel stress. Many relieve their stress with the form of dark humor. What most people may see as incentive, mean or despicable others find relief with humor.

Take care of your basic needs. Food, shelter, clothing and family. It’s important to remember that if you go down with illness it will affect more than just the people you work with.

Coping With Stress

It’s normal to feel sad, angry, confused or even scared during a crisis.

I wish anyone reading this health, safety and wellness. Please try not to panic over this war we have raging in the world. If we all do our part and work together we will get through this together.

Leave a comment and as always,

Gain The Advantage,

Alicia Osmera